Therapies

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Biofeedback

When it comes to body-focused psychotherapy, we are focusing on body sensation that often hold repressed memories, and gain the ability to regulate their autonomic body functions such as muscle tension, body temperature, heart rate and respiration. The use of biofeedback in therapy offers patients to gain greater awareness of their body’s physiological functions through the use of technological instruments designed to provide immediate information on the activity of those psychophysiological systems. The goal of biofeedback is to train patients to activate or deactivate psychophysiological systems at will, and therefore self-regulate their emotional, cognitive, and behavioral reactions. When combined with mind-focused, language-based approaches, patients can see sustainable relief from headaches, pain, hypertension and other physiological stress-related conditions. Biofeedback can help correct and fine-tune one’s breathing patterns, which has a direct impact on the physiology, mental and emotional states and can improve mental and physical states. Another benefit is linked to enhanced practice in meditation, which are specific techniques used to still and empty the mind allowing the natural homeostasis and healing process to begin. One of the most challenging tasks, the ability to focus and not react to distracting thought and feelings can be strengthened through guided practice using biofeedback technology.

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Biofeedback

Psychospirituality

Equally important in this integration is the role of one’s relationship to their spirituality and envelopment in religious practices. While many traditional psychotherapist historically tend to shy away from this topic, it is important that spirituality is understood and addressed as a legitimate dimension of human experience. The fact is that one’s spirituality develops and evolves over the lifespan and can be a part of the solution or a part of the problem. Despite the fact that many practitioners and patients tend to reduce spirituality and religiousness to psychological explanations, spirituality cannot be separated from psychotherapy. Spiritual issues often arise in patient’s lives and need to be considered as a critical ingredient in their lives, as they may serve as the source of ultimate anxiety or post-traumatic growth. Therefore as a spiritually-integrated psychotherapist, I listen carefully for such hidden communications and encourage patients to give voice to what may be difficult to express, and explore what may have been avoided in the past. Working through spiritual concerns and conflicts has been found to be of interest to most patients, and especially those who find themselves struggling with the underlying spiritual foundation of the 12-step fellowships for recovery from addictions (AA, NA, GA, etc.). Such patients may feel ostracized from these recovery programs if they voice spiritual struggles, be unable to engage in their recovery, or may drop-out prematurely. Therefore, addressing their issues with spirituality in the safety of a psychotherapeutic session will increase their chances towards recovery.

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Psychospirituality

Psychotherapy

My practice involves a multi-theoretical framework, that aims to integrate cognitive, behavioral, psychobiological, psychodynamic, and psychospiritual approaches. In contrast to the more common, unimodal approaches, which may only address either the mind or the physical symptoms, and where all patients receive the same interventions, I actively integrate diverse systems of psychotherapy to match the needs of each person. I tend to base my formulation on the psychoanalytical formulation, which permits a deeper understanding and is appreciative of patient’s unconscious dynamics, characterological development, environmental influences, strengths, and unique adaptive strategies. In the therapeutic sessions, I encourage each person to explore their current and past ways of experiencing themselves (physically, emotionally, and spiritually) and relating to others. This form of exploration brings about a greater self-understanding and resolution to the past traumatic experiences and inner conflicts, and ultimately leads to healing unhealthy relational patterns and producing profound changes in one's life.

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Psychotherapy